The Augmentationist Weekly: Broken Education, Social Media and Emotions

augmentationist_logoThe Augmentationist with links about education, social media and – yes! – augmentation. You can read The Augmentationist here and subscribe at the right-hand side of this site.

Peak Education

Futurist Bryan Alexander wonders whether the United States is experiencing peak education. After two generations of growth, American higher education has reached its upper bound. The student population seems to decline and families are not increasing higher education spending. The number of tenure-track faculty conducting research could very well top off. Of course, it’s not clear at all whether this is a temporary situation or a more durable trend. Be sure to have a look at the interesting discussion in the comments section.

Innovation and private investment in education

Education expert George Siemens attended an Education Innovation Summit and gives his impressions in a long post. It’s all about broken education, start-up entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and corporations wanting to innovate radically. Strangely enough, while wanting to revolutionize education, they seem rather conservative in accepting standardized tests. While Siemens is pro business and innovation, he’s clearly worried about the learners and society and uneasy about gatherings where everyone agrees on anything.

Social media making kids smarter?

Twitter and social media in general could very well make children better writers and thinkers. It seems students nowadays write longer, more intellectually complex papers. Is there a causal relationship, Freakonomics wonders.

Social media making people angrier?

Which emotion tends to go most viral? As most participants or readers of comment sections and social media realize, it’s anger, not sadness, joy or disgust. James Vincent at The Independent reports about research coming to the same conclusion.

Social Media Issues

At Stanford University the Social Media Issues course, facilitated by Howard Rheingold, started. One can comment on the blogs and participate in the Fishbowl forum. I read an excellent post aboutblogging and learning in public, in which a new article by Clive Thompson, Thinking Out Loud,  was quoted:

“But focusing on the individual writers and thinkers misses the point. The fact that so many of us are writing — sharing our ideas, good and bad, for the world to see — has changed the way we think. Just as we now live in public, so do we think in public. And that is accelerating the creation of new ideas and the advancement of global knowledge.”

Google Glass and iOS7

Don’t worry: I won’t start product reviews here – but this week I not only installed iOS7, I also experienced Google Glass (for a full fifteen minutes). Glass is all about integrating the power of the internet and computers in the natural flow of your life – it almost integrates the internet in your body. While starting to use iOS7 and going back an forth between an Android device and an iPhone, I realized this is the big battlefield: which operating system and manufacturer will be the best to augment us? In the meantime, Google not only wants to augment us, but also to make us live longer and better. Behind all this I guess there must be some philosophy which is as worth studying as the thinking of the Renaissance intellectuals.

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About rolandlegrand

I'm social media manager at Mediafin, the publisher of Belgium's leading business newspapers De Tijd and L'Echo. I have a special interest in the intersection of immersive media, business and philosophy.
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