The limits of blockchain, for now

An interesting take on the use of blockchain in the mass consumer markets by Adam Frisby, CEO and lead developer of Sinespace, a Unity-based MMO and social VR platform: on VentureBeat he explains “why blockchain isn’t ready for primetime“.

“As it stands, blockchain is caught between three competing objectives: fast, low-cost, and decentralized. It is not yet possible to make one chain that achieves all three”, Frisby says. A post written by someone who has first-hand experience in dealing with payments in game environments.

Note that the Blockstack-project I posted about is not based entirely on the bitcoin blockchain, presumably for some of the reasons discussed by Frisby. I’m not sure how exactly they improve on the blockchain.

Post from another internet

I’ve been experimenting with Graphite Docs, a decentralized app (DApp) on the Blockstack-platform. It works remarkably well, it’s like an alternative for Google Docs. I actually prepared this post using Graphite. What I dislike about the Blockstack-universe is that one has to pay in bitcoin in order to get a username. In my opinion a new internet should not identify itself with one particular crypto-currency. Fortunately, one can use Graphite also without a username, just by using your blockchain-based credentials. The blockchain used is the bitcoin blockchain, but I think to have understood they could also use other blockchains.

I guess it means we have the regular web now, the dark web which is accessible via the Tor browser, and the decentralized internet like the one presented by Blockstack (there are some other platforms for decentralized apps).

It’s interesting to note that Blockstack is both an open source project and a Public Benefit Corporation (PBC):

“Blockstack PBC, a Public Benefit Corp, upholds specific commitments to the greater public good in addition to stockholder interests. The mission of Blockstack PBC is to enable an open, decentralized internet. Blockstack PBC is committed to always keep the core Blockstack software open-source, and to support the decentralization of the Blockstack network. Blockstack PBC has historically taken the lead on Blockstack protocol development, but in the future will work with other parties to build a fully transparent and adaptable decentralized internet.”

For now there are only a few DApps consumer-ready on the Blockstack platform. It will be interesting to see what other apps become available and whether these apps will actually be used by a broader audience.

Decentralized internet for you and me

It seems all the talk about the “decentralized internet” gets more concrete for ordinary internet users (citizens?) like me. Tom Simonite at Wired did a great job explaining decentralized applications (DApps) in his article The Decentralized Internet Is Here, With Some Glitches. He discusses alternatives for Google Docs (using Graphite), eBay, YouTube (DTube) and so on.

Graphite proudly says it’s powered by Blockstack and that it is the first truly decentralized and encrypted replacement for Google G-Suite and Microsoft Office. Blockstack explaining Blockstack:

I’ll experiment with these things the next few days. Tom Simonite warns the DApps can be pretty clunky, but isn’t that the charm of all new developments? The more fundamental objection is whether we really want a kind of unbreakable, unstoppable communication network. Just asking the question might seem like heresy to cyber libertarians, but isn’t there some value in stopping criminals and terrorists from communicating in total freedom and secrecy? I guess there must be some balance here, figuring out how to organize that balance is a complicated matter.