How one second every day can change a life

Sometimes an idea is very simple, yet very deep. Like this idea of recording one second of every day of your life. That’s what Cesar Kuriyama did when he stopped working. He learned a lot by doing so. The BBC interviewed him and he was invited for a TED presentation.
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This is not an automatic capturing of some shots during your everyday life. The procedure Kuriyama proposes, involves decision-making. What are the images of the day you want to keep, so you’ll watch them one year from now, or ten years, or when you’re very old and about to pass away? To me it seems like an exercise in mindfulness. One might also wonder whether this recording ritual influences what one actually does during a particular day. Kuriyama himself says this whole procedure stimulates him to do at least one interesting thing each day.
Kuriyama also runs a blog, One Second Every Day, on which he published some of his favorite reactions on his TED talk. Someone had a very interesting vision: suppose that many people would start recording one second every day and that something very important on a worldwide scale happened, and one could look at that day through the eyes of ‘the human race’ just by telling the computer to make a selection from the accumulated recordings for that day. Or, less dramatic, suppose you could filter those recordings and tell the computer to show you a particular place through the eyes not of institutional reporters and communicators but again through the eyes of random people recording on that place their seconds of existence.
Anyway, Kuriyama launched a Kickstarter project for developing an app enabling us to record our life seconds. This app will be available in the next few days on iOS and later also on Android.
And this is the video of one year of Cesar Kuriyama:
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1 Second Everyday – Age 30 from Cesar Kuriyama on Vimeo.

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Update: the app is now available for iOS.

Apps on top of the real world

This seems to be pretty cool, but as you’ll see in the ‘read more’ section, it’s much more than just ‘cool’:

And here is how it works:

It’s build by Stockholm-based 13thlab.com and it’s an app available on iOS.

Using advanced computer vision, Minecraft Reality maps and tracks the world around you using the camera, and allows you to place Minecraft worlds in reality, and even save them in a specific location for others to look at.

Minecraft Reality is built on our PointCloud SDK. For more information, and examples of what people are placing, visit http://minecraftreality.com.

Just like the Google ARG Ingress, this is yet another example of the crumbling walls between the digital world and the world formerly known as the real world.

The guys of 13thLab claim: “We think the camera will replace the GPS as the most important sensor to interpret and make sense of the world around you.”

Hat tip for Bruce Sterling on Beyond the Beyond for posting about this.

Read also:
– If the world were your platform, what apps would you build, by Janko Roettgers at GigaOM. He asks the fascinating question: “If your apps aren’t just running on a phone or a tablet anymore, but essentially on top of the real world — what kind of apps do you build?”
– The World Is Not Enough: Google and the Future of Augmented Reality by Alexis C. Madrigal at theAtlantic.
-Minecraft creations meet the real world through augmented reality iOS app by David Meyer on GigaOM.