Liquid (Virtual) Newsroom Project Developed with Radical Openness

diagram illustrating liquid newsLiquidnews, or the Liquid Newsroom, is an emerging news project that’s all about the above strategy, radical openness. I found out about the project on Twitter via the #liquidnewshashtag. It’s where a group of people, many of whom are journalists, discuss a project for a “liquid” or a “virtual” newsroom.

They talk about what a Liquid Newsroom could be, about the business model, and the technological platform necessary make it happen. They exchange tweets such as this one from Steffen Konrath: “Currently exploring ways to add Sparkbox (@tonihopponen) & Clp.ly (@Kinanda) to the Liquid Newsroom project #liquidnews.”

On September 1, Konrath published a Liquid Newsroom Manifesto on his blog, which reads like a proposal for a kind of postmodern virtual enterprise. In his model, the relationship between the “outside” and the “inside” of a company changes fundamentally. For instance, he writes, that in this newsroom “the content is triggered by events and interest of the people, and not by the purpose of keeping a company alive.”

I had an interview with Steffen, which you can read on my blog at PBS MediaShift. Stay tuned for more about how virtual enterprises can help develop enterpreneurial journalism in the broadest sense of these words!

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How concept maps can be immersive

In this post I’ll talk about some rather simple immersive tools. They have to do with what knowledge is about, with visualization and non-linear thinking and presenting. Do not fear: there’s no need for high-end graphics. The elements on which this simple immersiveness is based are non-linearity, interactivity and visualization.

In the personal learning environments course #PLENK2010 you can find a discussion thread about concept mapping, with George Siemens providing a link to a paper about The Theory Underlying Concept Maps and How to Construct and Use Them by Joseph D. Novak and Alberto J. Cañas (Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition).

Siemens explains: “Concept mapping assumes relatedness of knowledge – i.e. the information you connect is what produces your knowledge.” The course uses Cmap but personally I love using MindMeister (which allows for open wiki mindmaps), for instance I made this map about real-time web and news media for a seminar in Moscow:

Please note that I only provided a basic structure for the map – others added many nodes, provided Russian translations etc in a pure wiki-style. The reason I like those maps is that they allow for non-linear thinking and discussion. The enhance a more organic, associative way of reflecting on things. Compare having a group discussion with a linear powerpoint presentation versus a more brainstorming type of session, or at least a meeting where people are allowed to really interact and to go back and forth the points discussed – eventually adding or eliminating discussion nodes.

Actually, you can use non-linear presentations derived directly from concept maps for larger audiences. A colleague of mine introduced me to an interesting tool, Prezi, which helps you to do just that.

Here is an example of such a Prezi presentation about teaching mathematics by Guy Murphy:

There are other examples at the Prezi site. The big advantage of a Prezi presentation, when used for an actual living audience, is that it’s very flexible and incites the group to connect ideas in ways which may even surprise the presenter.

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Second Life cohort will augment online seminars with virtual spaces at #PLENK2010

plenk2010 hq in chilbo

This is the virtual reading and meeting room for the connectivism courses in the virtual town Chilbo in Second Life. As pointed out in a comment on my previous post, there is a Second Life cohort (group PLENK2010) getting ready to experiment and a wiki has been launched.

One of the problems is that however immersive and engaging synchronous online meetings may be, they do cost time. There are already weekly Elluminate sessions to be followed for the PLENK2010 course, adding meetings in Second Life is not self-evident.

Glen Gatin on Conviviality Corners suggests to organize meetings in Second Life, enabling participants to share the same virtual space while attending the Elluminate sessions. Using UStream it might be possible to intervene (also using voice) from within Second Life.

But is there enough added value in this? People in Elluminate already can use a white-board and audio, maybe even video. The experiment will have to demonstrate that sharing a same space, creating watercooler-moments before and after the meeting, leads to more engagement and immersiveness.

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Time for our personal learning environments #PLENK2010

It’s that time of the year again I start asking myself whether to register for the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) “Connectivism and Connective Knowledge” again. I did so previous years, and even though I never managed to follow-up on the activities till the end, I always learned stuff and enjoyed the discussion with the other participants.

This year it seems the course is called Personal Learning Environments, Networks and Knowledge 2010. This course is a joint venture between the National Research Council of Canada (Institute for Information Technology, Learning and collaborative Technologies Group, PLE Project), The Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca University and the University of Prince Edward Island. Facilitators: George Siemens, TEKRI, Stephen Downes, NRC, Dave Cormier, UPEI, Rita Kop, NRC.

From the forums I quote this:

The idea behind the personal learning environment is that the management of learning migrates from the institution to the learner. The PLE connects to a number of remote services, some that specialise in learning and some that do not. Access to learning becomes access to the resources and services offered by these remote services. The PLE allows the learner not only to consume learning resources, but to produce them as well. Learning therefore evolves from being a transfer of content and knowledge to the
production of content and knowledge.” (Downes, 2007, 19)

In other words, what does it mean and how do we proceed when we use online networks, social bookmarks, collaborative video sharing and editing platforms, virtual environments, blogs and wikis (forgetting many other services and applications) in order to organize our own learning process?

The question interests me a lot. The previous years however I felt the course was very much a paradise for academics and teachers. Learning of course goes far beyond that, and my own interest is more how to organize self- and group-learning later in life, independently from the educational institutions.

Anyway, even though it is in a very classical classroom setting, I did like this video by Patricio Bustamante about personal learning environments (and of course academics and teachers never use full words but prefer talking about “PLE”):

Even though the course is about to enter the second week, there is still time to register. It is a connectivist type of (free!) course, based on aggregation, remixing, repurposing and feeding forward. It’s a bewildering experience but then again, you’re not supposed to learn and study all the stuff which is presented, it’s about using tools and creating collaboratively (I think).

There are quite a few Second Life residents active in the course, just do a “second life” search in the forums! Telmea Story launched a SL group PLENK2010.

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Also Twitter wants to be fast, easy and fun – sounds familiar?

So Twitter should be fast and easy. And fun of course. If not, they won’t ever go mainstream. For someone covering Second Life, it all sounds very familiar.

One of the interesting points I learned watching Robert Scoble’s live video stream during the Twitter press conference this week was that the overwhelming majority of Twitter users just use the website, there where no self-respecting member of the tech-elite ever go. The social media and tech people think it is so self-evident to use clients such as Tweetdeck or Seesmic that they cannot even imagine that everybody else just goes to www.twitter.com.
That silent majority is rather, well, silent. They (okay, many of them) use Twitter as a kind of social RSS-reader without engaging in a conversation or even without retweeting stuff. Twitter itself seems to consider their service as a real time news network rather than as a social network. A news network like CNN let’s say, but more customizable. But many users are there to consume news, just as they consume news watching CNN.
Let’s compare this with Second Life. The most vocal residents are the builders and scripters, the traders, the organizers. They are a minority – even though without them there would be no such thing as Second Life. This is not surprising: on web forums, discussion boards and chat rooms the really active people are a minority, and the bulk of the activity comes from a tiny group of very active people.
The challenge is to keep that minority happy while realizing that the needs and expectations of the overwhelming majority are different. I guess the web version of Twitter will be a success among the majority, while the power users will stick to their sophisticated client where they can manage all their different social media accounts.
The same probably applies for Second Life and similar virtual worlds. One needs viewer versions or settings which cater for the socializers or for users of devices such as the iPad, other versions can focus on the heavy users and content creators.
“Fast, easy and fun” will be crucial criteria for new media wanting to gain traction. “Fun like the iPhone” Philip Rosedale said during the Second Life Community Convention (SLCC) in Boston. “The iPhone is slower (…) but it’s delightful” he said. Just like reading Twitter or Facebook on Flipboard is maybe a bit slower, but more delightful. Don’t look down on that – making things delightful is the way to really change things.
Here is the video Scoble made at the Twitter conference:
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welcome screen of reaction grid Chilbo is the Second Life town/community to which I belong, and they not only became official partner the Metanomics show, but also became the first…

Is scale a condition of possibility for open source projects?

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInChilbo is the Second Life town/community to which I belong, and they not only became official partner the Metanomics show, but also became the first…" target="_blank" >Share on TumblrPin on PinterestChilbo is the Second Life town/community to which I belong, and they not only became official partner the Metanomics show, but also became the first…" target="_blank" >Share on RedditChilbo is the Second Life town/community to which I belong, and they not only became official partner the Metanomics show, but also became the first…" target="_blank" >Share on StumbleUponChilbo is the Second Life town/community to which I belong, and they not only became official partner the Metanomics show, but also became the first…&Body=%20http://www.mixedrealities.com/2010/04/07/is-scale-a-condition-of-possibility-for-open-source/">Email this to someone

- Tomorrow, Tuesday April 6 at Noon SLT/PST, We Are The Network at the Epoch Institute in Second Life about Trends and Ethics in Image Enhancement and Alteration. As usual, lots of…

Upcoming events: Ethics and Image Alteration, the future of the world, art and MetaMeets

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEpoch Institute in Second Life about Trends and Ethics in Image Enhancement and Alteration. As usual, lots of…" target="_blank" >Share on TumblrPin on PinterestEpoch Institute in Second Life about Trends and Ethics in Image Enhancement and Alteration. As usual, lots of…" target="_blank" >Share on RedditEpoch Institute in Second Life about Trends and Ethics in Image Enhancement and Alteration. As usual, lots of…" target="_blank" >Share on StumbleUponEpoch Institute in Second Life about Trends and Ethics in Image Enhancement and Alteration. As usual, lots of…&Body=%20http://www.mixedrealities.com/2010/04/05/upcoming-events-ethics-and-image-alteration-the/">Email this to someone

Clay Shirky in Amsterdam, at the Picnic conference (September 2008) Clay Shirky posted a thought-provoking analysis about complex business models: The Collapse of Complex Business…

Social media as a way to save us from collapsing complexities

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn The Collapse of Complex Business…" target="_blank" >Share on TumblrPin on Pinterest The Collapse of Complex Business…" target="_blank" >Share on Reddit The Collapse of Complex Business…" target="_blank" >Share on StumbleUpon The Collapse of Complex Business…&Body=%20http://www.mixedrealities.com/2010/04/03/social-media-as-a-way-to-save-us-from-collapsing/">Email this to someone